Archive for October, 2013

Breast cancer

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Turmeric Face Mask Pack For Acne Treatment and Healthy glowing Skin

Turmeric Face Mask Pack For Acne Treatment and Healthy glowing Skin

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=32qlo3WQiZc

The dangers of slimming pills

The dangers of slimming pills

by NAOMI COLEMAN, femail.co.uk

Would you ever consider taking diet pills to help you lose weight?

According to a femail.co.uk poll 35 per cent of people say anything is worth a go if it helps shift those extra pounds.

Another third of those taking part in the vote said they did not trust their safety while the remainder said they would only take them if they could research them thoroughly.

Diet experts warn that many people eager to shed inches are unaware that some slimming pills available can trigger serious side effects – leading to death in some cases.

Obesity, which now affects one in five adults in Britain, is a major cause of ill health. But patients taking anti-obesity pills need to be aware that they should combine any drugs with diet and exercise under strict medical supervision.

Slimming pills can be loosely divided into three groups. Licensed pharmaceutical drugs, prescribed by NHS doctors; unlicensed pharmaceutical drugs available at private slimming clinics, and natural slimming products sold over-the-counter.

Unlicensed drugs

There are only a few licensed pharmaceutical slimming drugs in Britain. This is because the Government has systematically banned certain slimming pills shown to cause side effects and in some cases death.

The move to ban some pharmaceutical slimming pills followed concerns by medics that too many unscrupulous doctors were operating outside guidelines published by the Royal College of Physicians four years ago. The report recommended tighter restrictions on slimming drugs saying they should be taken only by the seriously obese under strict supervision.

Last year a survey by Health Which? Magazine revealed that one in two private slimming clinics were handing out unlicensed obesity drugs to women who didn’t have a weight problem.

Professor Rowland Jung who runs an obesity clinic at Ninewells Hospital in Tayside, warns of the dangers of such clinics.

‘People are really desperate and flocking to private slimming practices because there are too few NHS obesity clinics,’ he says. ‘The problem is there are no licensing laws for private practices, so we don’t know if their standards are up to scratch.’

He also believes there are many other dangers involved.

‘Some clinicians are relying on drugs to lose weight when it’s actually the diet and exercise that counts too. They do not ask for the medical history of the patient, so they don’t know about the individual’s genetic health.

‘They may also be handing out combinations of drugs that might react with each other which could cause any number of side effects. Other clinicians are handing out addictive drugs such as amphetamines.’

To make matters worse, a doctor registered in the UK can prescribe an unlicensed medicine, as long as the doctor assumes personal responsibility. This means doctors can prescribe anti-obesity drugs with known side effects.

Clinically trialled drugs

At the moment there are only two licensed slimming drugs. Orlistat, which is available by prescription, and methylcellulose sold over the counter. Another drug called Sibutramine is in the pipeline.

Orlistat: Also known as Xenicol, Orlistat prevents fat from being absorbed into the blood stream. The drug has been designed to dump fat in the bowels instead. The drug is non-addictive and should be used over three months in conjunction with a fat-reduced diet.

Celevac: has methylcellulose as its active ingredient. It is claimed to reduce a person’s intake of food by producing a feeling of fullness. Methylcellulose is also licensed as a laxative.

Sibutramine: Due on the market this summer, Sibutramine which will be marketed as Reductil, works by leaving patients feeling full if they eat only a fraction of their normal intake. It increases the feeling of fullness rather than suppressing the appetite like amphetamine-based slimming pills. It also speeds up the metabolic rate. One private clinic in London is already prescribing Sibutramine to patients.

 

Banned pharmaceutical drugs

Last year the appetite suppressant phentermine marketed as Duromine and Ionamin, was officially withdrawn in Britain by the European Commission. This addictive drug, which is similar to amphetamine or speed, is linked to heart palpitations and high blood pressure and could cause damage to heart valves.

Other side-effects include restlessness, headaches, constipation and even hair loss.

A similar slimming drug, amfepramone (Tenuate Dospan, Diethylpropion) which had been the subject of fears over heart damage, was temporarily withdrawn from the British market. But following an appeal, the Medicines Control Agency has lifted the ban on these products until the European Court reaches a final decision.

Three years ago the slimming drugs dexfenfluramine and fenfluramine, also known as Adifax and Ponderax, which come from the same chemical family as phentermine were banned.

These drugs have been linked to side-effects including hallucinations and palpitations. Also primary pulmonary hypertension, a rare form of high blood pressure which can lead to heart failure.

Herbal slimming products

There are also a handful of unlicensed herbal slimming pills available over the counter at chemists. These include fibre-based tablets and natural products to supress the appetite, such as Chromium, and fat burning substances, such as Carcinia Cambogia.

Professor Jung says: ‘Many of these herbal slimming pills are a gimmick. There is no scientifically controlled evidence to prove that they work.

‘In the case of diuretics – where the body eliminates water through urine – there is no evidence that shows people can lose weight through water. People can lose too much water and this can cause the kidney to shut down.

‘Too many laxatives – chemicals that stimulate bowel movement – can lead to bowel disease. The bacteria in the gut changes and fails to protect the gut walls.’

• If you suffer from an obesity problem, contact your local GP who will refer you to an NHS obesity clinic. For more information, visit http://www.tayendoweb-co.uk.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-27531/The-dangers-slimming-pills.html

10 Common Habits That Damage the Kidneys

10 Common Habits That Damage the Kidneys

Kidney disease is one of the costliest illnesses in the world and managing kidney disease is very expensive.

Each year, lots of people die of kidney disease all over the world, and the number of people suffering from chronic renal failure, and need dialysis or kidney transplantation to stay alive keep increasing.Statistics have it that, worldwide, more than millions patients are waiting for kidney transplants, but only a few thousands will receive transplants because of shortage of suitable organ donors.Patients usually felt surprised when they are diagnosed of Kidney Failure.

Experts have found the explanation from your daily life habits.Here are the top habits which lead to your kidney failure:1. Not emptying your bladder early:Maintaining a full bladder for a long time is a quick way of causing bladder damage. That the urine stays in the bladder for a long time can cause the bacteria breeding in urine to multiply quickly. Once the urine refluxes back to ureter and kidneys, the bacteria can result in kidney infections, then urinary tract infection, and then nephritis, even Uremia.

So, no matter how busy you are, remember to drink a lot of water and urinate regularly. Once you form the habit of holding back urine, it will ultimately damage your kidneys.

2. Not drinking enough water:The main functions of the kidneys are to regulate erythrocyte balances and eliminate metabolic wastes in urine. If we do not drink enough water, the blood will be concentrated and the blood flow to the kidney will not be adequate, thus the function of eliminating toxins in from blood will be impaired.

3. Taking too much salt:  95% sodium we consume through food is metabolized by the kidneys.

Exceeding the salt intake will make the kidneys work harder to excrete the excess salt and can lead to decreased kidney function. This excess sodium will cause water retention, causing edema. Edema usually elevates blood pressure and increases the risk of developing kidney disease. The daily salt intake should be controlled within 6g per day.

4. Not treating common infections quickly and properly: Common infections, such as pharyngitis, tonsillitis, common cold etc, usually triggers or aggravates kidney damage. They do this by causing an acute attack of acute glomerulonephritis or chronic nephritis. So, you will see that people who get kidney disease for the first time or whose illness condition becomes worse usually present in hospitals with a history of cold or sore throat.If after having cold, symptoms like blood in urine, swelling, headache, nausea, vomiting, fatigue, poor appetite appear, you should consult your doctor immediately, to assess your kidney functions, and start treatment if compromised.

5. Eating too much meat:  Eating too much meat and protein can increase the metabolic load of the kidney. For those suffering from proteinuria, meat consumption too may aggravate protein leakage, worsening renal pathological lesion.It is suggested that protein intake should be 0.8g/kg per day. This means that a person with 50 kg should consume 40g of protein per day. Meat consumption per day should be limited within 300g.

 

6. Not eating enough:This is equally as dangerous as eating too much, both of them will lead damages to your digestive organs where is full of mucosal tissues. Mucosal tissues relates closely to your immune system. This is why many kidney failure patients are diagnosed with “autoimmune kidney damages”.

7. Painkiller abuse: The use of analgesics for a prolonged duration may reduce the flow blood and greatly affect kidney function. In addition, patients with analgesic-induced renal failure are more likely to suffer from bladder cancer.>> Use analgesics only when it’s absolutely necessary, learn to rest instead of taking to the bottles. If you have been on pain killers for a long term, it’s about time you had a test to access you renal function done. 

8. Missing your drugs:Hypertension and diabetes have been shown to precipitate or accelerate kidney damage, so if you are diagnosed as having any of these disease don’t live your life in denial, USE YOUR DRUGS.This will ultimately help control your condition while also helping to preserve your kidneys.

9. Drinking too much alcohol: Drinking alcohol without limitation may cause the deposition of uric acid in renal tubules, causing tubular obstruction and increasing risks of kidney failure.

10. Not resting enough:In our society, hypertension as a severe threat to life is largely due to stress. A common symptom of stress is insomnia. Blood pressure may increase by an average of 2-5mg/Hg because of insomnia. Chronically elevated blood pressure can cause damage to kidney capillaries giving rise to kidney problems. Thus, we need to develop a good attitude to life and strike a good balance between work and rest to protect your kidneys and live a healthy life.At the early stage of kidney diseases, there are usually no the special symptoms, so lots of patients are not diagnosed until the acute attack appears or the illness condition develops into the late stage.

So you should endeavor to do kidney function test from time to time to assess how healthy your kidneys are.

Never ignore the soreness of waist, swelling of the feet, changes in urine color or volume, increase in night urination, palor, high blood pressure and other such symptoms.

Once found, you should go and see your doctor immediately.

9 things you should unlearn about tea

9 things you should unlearn about tea

 

February 15, 2009|By Julie Deardorff, Tribune Health & Fitness Reporter

It’s true that, unlike the rest of the world, Americans more often drink our tea instant and iced. But a revolution is brewing.

We’re warming up to the beneficial qualities of tea, the second most popular drink on the planet behind water.Tea sales in the U.S. are expected to double over the next five years, bolstered by a growing interest in its potential health benefits, according to market research firm Packaged Facts.

Starbucks, meanwhile, has introduced syrupy-sweet concoctions known as Tea Lattes and Tea Infusions. And 6-year-old competitor Argo Tea now has 13 Chicago stores, including “tea-osks” in hospitals, and plans to expand to New York later this year, a spokeswoman said.

“People come to tea as an alternative to coffee,” Bill Todd, owner of Todd & Holland Tea Merchants in Forest Park, told me. “They like that it has caffeine but doesn’t slam you. And they’re looking for health benefits.”

Still, Todd tries to educate his customers because so many misconceptions about tea are rampant. He set us straight on a few, included below. Think you know what you’re sipping in that teacup? Read on …

MYTH: Tea comes in many varieties.

False! Only one plant gives us tea leaves — the Camellia sinensis. The differences in color and flavor among the three basic types — black, green and oolong — depend on how the leaves are processed. For black tea, the most popular type of tea in the U.S., the tea leaves are exposed to air, or allowed to oxidize. Green teas are less processed to preserve the green color and delicate flavor. Oolong tea is between black and green.

MYTH: Herbal tea is tea.

False! Even more shocking is that Rooibos isn’t tea either. Technically, tea must come from the Camillia sinensis plant. Herbal teas such as Celestial Seasonings’ popular Sleepytime product are made from other plants and called “tisanes.” Rooibos or “red tea” is not a leaf; it’s a seed from a bush that grows in South Africa. Though herbal teas can have health benefits, most of the research has been done on tea, not tisanes.

MYTH: Tea can help fight cancer.

True — if you’re a rat. Studies show tea has a powerful cancer-fighting effect in rodents, said nutrition professor Jeffrey Blumberg, who runs the Antioxidants Research Laboratory at Tufts University. For humans, the data are less clear. But tea can help reduce your risk of heart disease, Blumberg told me. Catechins, a type of flavonoid, are what make tea healthy. Flavonoids are plant compounds known as phytochemicals. Tea is one of the most highly concentrated food sources of catechins.

MYTH: Black tea contains more caffeine than green tea.

False! Even though some black teas have names like “Awake” and green teas are called “Zen,” the difference between green and black tea is in the processing, something that doesn’t affect caffeine content. Because they’re derived from the same plant, they contain similar amounts unless you brew your green tea for short periods. By the same token, green tea isn’t healthier than black tea.

MYTH: You can decaffeinate a regular tea.

False! You can certainly try, as I have, by brewing a cup for 30 seconds, tossing out the water, and starting again. But this popular technique isn’t backed by any evidence. If it does work, you’re not just tossing out caffeine, you’re also throwing out catechins and flavonoids, which tend to be released in the first 30 seconds.

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MYTH: Drinking green tea will make you skinny.

False! Some scientists speculate that caffeine and EGCG — a highly active catechin in tea — may act together to increase fat oxidation. But study results are mixed, and the effects, if any, are so modest that they’ll be wiped out by half an Oreo, said Blumberg. Still, tea has zero calories if you don’t add milk, honey or sugar. (A 12-ounce Tazo Berry Chai Tea Infusion from Starbucks has about 190 calories.) So even if tea doesn’t boost your metabolism, as some say, it can have a good substitution effect.

MYTH: Adding milk negates the health benefits of tea.

It might! But it might not. Only one study has shown that adding milk decreases the body’s ability to absorb catechins in tea. But the results haven’t been replicated, said Blumberg. The debate is whether the proteins in milk bind to the flavonoids in tea, potentially reducing them.

MYTH: Restaurants know how to serve tea.

Not necessarily. If they give you a cup of hot water with the tea bag on the side, you’re forced to push the floating tea bag down with a spoon or, even worse, your finger. Bad, bad, bad! “Always put the tea bag in first, then add the water,” Mark Ukra counseled in “The Ultimate Tea Diet” (Collins Living, $16.99). Ukra also wrote that if you’re making it at home, put milk in first, then the tea bag and then the water. Others (including my husband) insist that you should add milk after the water. Use boiling water for black tea and brew three to five minutes. For green tea, steep for two to three minutes in water that was about to boil, says the Tea Association.

MYTH: Tea bags are lowbrow.

Actually, they come in classy whole-leaf mesh pouches these days. Michelle Wu, owner of Chicago’s Loose Leaf Tea Loft, noted that loose-leaf teas are considered higher quality than bagged tea because the leaves are larger and have more room to expand and give up their flavor. If you do use tea bags, “buy a brand such as Mighty Leaf where you can actually see the tea leaves,” said Susan Blumberg, author of “All the Tea in Chicago” (Des Voeux, $9.99).

———–

jdeardorff@tribune.com

http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2009-02-15/features/0902110315_1_black-tea-second-most-popular-drink-tea-lattes