Posts Tagged ‘ecofrenlovehate’

Pedometer usage

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Home to world’s smallest and biggest eggs

China: Home to world’s smallest and biggest eggs – Home – ShortList Magazine

China: Home to world’s smallest and biggest eggs

Insert egg-pun here

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A farmer was surprised to collect a super small egg from the chicken pen at their home in Yangzhou, eastern China’s Jiangsu Province. The tiny egg is just 2.5cm long and weighs 5 grams, equivalent to a 10 cent Chinese coin.

This comes two months after a farmer from Shuangliu in southwest China found that one of her chickens laid a huge 250g egg. Wang Yongbi said: “I’ve been raising chickens for more than 30 years but it’s the first time I’ve seen such a huge egg.” Wang said she fed the chickens no special food, but grains, maize and vegetable leaves. She added: “Normally the eggs are small”.

Which is interesting.

http://www.shortlist.com/home/china-home-to-worlds-smallest-and-biggest-eggs

Hepatitis C linked to tattoo ink

Hepatitis C linked to tattoo ink

Researchers are hoping that people will do some research about where to get a tattoo, after a study found a link between body art and hepatitis C.

The new study found that people with the virus were almost four times more likely to report having a tattoo, even when other major risk factors were taken into account, co-author Dr. Fritz Francois of New York University Langone Medical Center told Reuters Health.

Although the study could not prove a direct cause and effect, “Tattooing in and of itself may pose a risk for this disease that can lay dormant for many, many years,” Francois said.

About 3.2 million people in the U.S. have hepatitis C, and many don’t know because they don’t feel ill, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Hepatitis C is the leading cause of liver cancer and most common reason for liver transplants in the U.S. Some 70 percent of people infected will develop chronic liver disease, and up to 5 percent will die from cirrhosis or liver cancer.

For the current study, researchers asked almost 2,000 people about their tattoos and hepatitis status, among other questions, at outpatient clinics at three New York area hospitals between 2004 and 2006.

Researchers found that 34 percent of people with hepatitis C had a tattoo, compared to 12 percent of people without the infection.

The most common routes of contracting hepatitis C, a blood-borne disease, are through a blood transfusion before 1992 or a history of injected drug use. Injected drug use accounts for 60 percent of new hepatitis cases every year, but 20 percent of cases have no history of injected drug use or other exposure, according to the CDC.

Francois and his colleagues only included people with hepatitis C who did not contract it from these two other common sources.

After accounting for other risk factors, the difference between people with and without hepatitis was even greater, with four times as many tattoos in the infected group than for uninfected people, according to results published in the journal Hepatology.

“This is not a big surprise to me,” Dr. John Levey, clinical chief of gastroenterology at the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester, told Reuters Health. Earlier studies had found a link, but they were small and had not taken other risk factors into account as well as this new one did.

“This was one of the stragglers, and now we finally have some numbers for it,” said Levey, who was not involved in the study.

Still, the CDC’s Dr. Scott Holmberg said the link may not be quite as strong as the findings suggest, because some people who had used illegal drugs probably would not admit it, even on an anonymous questionnaire. And the researchers didn’t rule out people who contracted hepatitis before getting their tattoo.

What to look for in a tattoo parlor

Holmberg, of the CDC’s viral hepatitis division, recommends people only have tattoos or piercings done by trained professionals.

“In the U.S., there have been no reports of hepatitis C outbreaks linked to professional tattoo parlors,” told Reuters Health by email.

In 2012, 1 in 5 people reported having at least 1 tattoo, according to a Harris poll.

“There are very reputable places that use appropriate standards,” said Francois. Tattoo parlors are not federally regulated, and standards vary by state and region, so it’s up to the consumer to do their homework, he said.

The Alliance for Professional Tattooists recommend finding a tattoo artist who wears disposable gloves, a clean work space without blood spatters and single-use disposable needle kits.

Levey said he wouldn’t prevent his two adult daughters from getting tattoos, but he would make sure they were aware of the hepatitis C risk first.

“A lot of their friends have tattoos, it’s the cool thing to do,” he said. “They’re adults, they can make their own decisions. But I’d mention this to them, because the long-term consequences of hepatitis C are so serious.”

 

What is EECP? Enhanced External Counter Pulsation EECP

What is EECP?

Enhanced External Counter Pulsation EECP

For people with angina or heart failure, even simple activities — such as going to the mailbox or walking the dog — can be challenging.

If you are one of these people, take heart. There is a non-invasive treatment called EECP® Therapy that clinical experience has shown to be safe and to have benefit for the treatment of angina and heart failure. Approximately 80% of patients who complete the 35-hour course of EECP® Therapy experience significant symptom relief that may last up to three years.

EECP® Therapy is an outpatient treatment for angina and heart failure. Treatments are usually given for an hour each day, five days a week, for a total of 35 hours. During the treatment, you lie on a comfortable treatment table with large blood pressure-like cuffs wrapped around your legs and buttocks. These cuffs inflate and deflate at specific times between your heartbeats. A continuous electro cardiogram (ECG) is used to set the timing so the cuffs inflate while the heart is at rest, when it normally gets its supply of blood and oxygen. The cuffs deflate at the end of that rest period, just before the next heart beat. The special sensor applied to your finger checks the oxygen level in your blood and monitors the pressure waves created by the cuff inflations and deflations.